Saturday, November 22, 2014

22-November-2014
Great Hall

 Downpatrick, Northern Ireland


Setlist (Thanks David K./Pablo G.)
Celtic Swing
Blue Money
Motherless Child
Melancholia
Someone Like You
Wavelength
Enlightenment
Choppin' Wood
Baby Please Don't Go/Parchman Farm
Rough God Goes Riding
Magic Time
In The Midnight
Moondance
St James Infirmary
Glad Tidings
Keep it Simple
Help Me/Lonely Avenue
Gloria

Big Hand for The Band!
Chris White (Saxophone)
Alistair White (Trombone)
Dave Keary (Guitar)
Paul Moore (Bass)
Paul Moran (Keyboards)
Bobby Ruggiero (Drums)
Dana Masters (Vocals)

Friday, November 21, 2014

Van's Concert Schedule



22-Nov-14
Downpatrick, Northern Ireland
The Great Hall

23-Nov-14
Downpatrick, Northern Ireland
The Great Hall

19-Dec-14
London, England
Nell's Jazz & Blues Bar

20-Dec-14
London, England
Nell's Jazz & Blues Bar

21-Dec-14
London, England
Nell's Jazz & Blues Bar

19-Jan-15
Barcelona, Spain
Gran Teatre del Liceu

26-Jan-15
Glasgow, Scotland
Glasgow Royal Concert Hall

15-Mar-15
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Europa Hotel

Monday, November 17, 2014

17-November-2014
Lyric Threatre

 London, England

LIT UP INSIDE : A short personal reflection

If anyone had asked me 10, 15, 20 years ago what sort of Van concert I’d love to see most of all – this would have been it. Van performing with real thought and care some of his best songs, with great intros and explanations, and very sympathetic backing from a small rhythm section. I’ve seen the Coleraine conversation and playing with Derek Bell on TV in ‘88, but I missed the Swansea Literature event with Gerald Dawe in ‘95, so it was wonderful to finally get to enjoy The Man stripped down to basic Van, and firing on all cylinders.

The first 50 minutes was taken up with a chat in armchairs between Van and Ian Rankin, whose main hero Rebus is always playing Astral Weeks; a couple of film clips from old TV programmes – Dylan and Van on the Hill of the Muses, and Van talking with Michael Longley; and readings of the lyrics from Michael Longley and Edna O’Brien. The introductions were made by Eamon Hughes, the editor of Van’s lyric book.
Ian and Van hit it off pretty much straight away and had obviously been talking for a while backstage – Ian came out with some real sensible questions and some good quips too – the one about George Best Airport being a goodie. When asked how it felt having Bob play behind him on Foreign Window, Van cracked that Dylan had done it before – for Harry Belafonte! - Bob’s first professional recording. Some questions from the audience elicited one or two good comments including the possible derivation of ‘Justin’ by Paul Durcan. But like most of these things Van has stock answers, and although Ian did throw him a couple of times, it was all entertaining and interesting.


The film of Van chatting with Michael Longley from Without Walls led into Michael reading a couple of lyrics – Coney Island and Into The Mystic. Just proved to me that lyrics are not poetry. However Edna O’Brien put a whole different spin on the lyrics, and Madame George became mesmerising with her soft brogue and emphasis in unusual places, and following the verses right through to the end repetition.


After the interval came the piece de resistance – a superb selection of songs with Van singing so well and getting deeply into the music. The band were following him with delicacy and precision – Dave Keary’s fills and trills were exceptional. Van was seated for most of the show and played acoustic on Foreign Window and electric on Why Must I? and Mystic, and took a few solos.

His readings of the songs were by no means straightfoward, adding intonations, asides and extra lyrics, and using that powerful voice to real emotive power. Many of the songs early in the set got explanations before and after, and Madame George even had location references during the song. Coney Island brought a memory to him while singing and he stifled a laugh and added a line about ‘dropping you off at the corner’! Strange he should perform Wonderful Remark when it’s not in the book – Volume 2 next year?


Both Madame George (actually sang as Madame Joy) and On Hyndford Street were tour de forces, both using different voices to complement the music. These songs bring Belfast alive for me, and I can imagine those long 1950s Sunday summer nights lying in bed trying to get to sleep while listening to the radio. He had those voices over Beechie River, I had tennis players from the tennis club – we all had our own sounds floating in on the warm air. Sunday six bells – what a great phrase. And adding in Satre and Christmas Humphreys for good measure tonight.

Van proved again that lyrics are lyrics – they are different with every night, every nuance, every musician, every improv, every original thought that inspired them for the singer, and every new thought they bring to the listener. I don’t care now if I never see Van again – I’ve fulfilled every ambition by seeing and living and breathing this Lit Up Inside show. But as Van told us tonight it’s always being NOW, but there will be other NOWs to come till we get the healing done.
10/10
-Simon Gee



Telegraph

Irish poet Michael Longley promised a unique night, and "Van Morrison presents an evening of words & music" was certainly that, not least because we heard Edna O'Brien reading Madame George as a poem.
The event, at London's Lyric Theatre, was to mark a new book brought out by Faber, Lit Up Inside, which contains the lyrics to nearly 200 Morrison songs, presented as poems.
So was Van the Man lit up? At times, definitely, but there were also moments of vintage deadpan Morrison. The second half of the evening was a concert. He introduced Foreign Window by saying: "This was partly based on a documentary about Lord Byron in which he said 'I have learned to love despair'. I wish I could."
It was mainly chatty Van rather than grumpy Van treading the boards, though, and novelist Ian Rankin did a good job of drawing out anecdotes during a 25-minute question-and-answer session. We had listened to Dr Eamonn Hughes talking about Morrison and watched film footage of Morrison singing with Bob Dylan, and when Rankin asked him how many people have had Dylan as an accompanist, Morrison said: "Harry Belafonte, for one." Asked by Rankin about shows like the X Factor, and whether they were for people "selling their souls", Morrison replied: "Nothing has changed. I wish it had."
The thing about Morrison is that he adores music. Old jazz musicians who know him will tell you that he is passionate about the music of his youth - Morrison is 69 - and he was fulsome in his praise of blues musicians such as Sonny Boy Williamson, Leroy Carr and Lightnin' Hopkins. "it's difficult to understand how people supposed to be so uneducated, like Lightnin', were coming up with Elizabethan language and imagery in songs that were like poetry," Morrison said. He talked here with real fondness about the jazz and blues he had heard as a boy, both from his father's record collection and by listening to AFN radio. "Ray Charles, Sidney Bechet, Mahalia Jackson singing the Lord's Prayer. It was only years later I realised that wasn't normal. I heard Lenny Bruce doing a sketch about Stars of Jazz when he was an in-thing."

Longley, 75, told the audience that what he and Morrison talked about most was jazz: Billie Holiday and Bessie Smith – "where it began" – and the man known as Dr Jazz of Belfast, the late Solly Lipsitz, who ran the Atlantic Records shop on Belfast High Street.
If there was a point to the evening, and to the book, it seemed to be to place Morrison among the literary figures of Ireland. Morrison compared himself to William Blake (he had London, I had East Belfast seemed to be the gist)and used the term 'Blake-ian' three times. But it wasn't all portentous. Morrison has a funny side (he is a fan of Spike Milligan and The Goons and is good at impersonations) and this came across in a few replies to Rankin. After Morrison said that "I wrote poems before I ever picked up a guitar", Rankin asked if a young boy in Belfast would have had to hide his poetry writing for fear of being beaten up. "My first poem was about a shipyard and you wouldn't have been beaten up for that," Morrison joked. He was also witty when Rankin listed the writers Morrison had name-checked in a song (Beckett, Joyce and Wilde), with the singer saying: "Yes, and George Best and Alex Higgins, too."
But both Longley and O'Brien repeatedly described the songs they were reading as poems. O'Brien admitted that she has always been "a little stuck on him" and said she thought he was "in the business of making magic". The 83-year-old author of The Country Girls read his Astral Weeks song Madame George particularly well – and it would be easy to trip up over the lines:
'And the love that loves to love,
That loves the love that loves,
The love that loves to love,
The love that loves to love,
The love that loves.'

Morrison, dressed in his John Lee Hooker outfit (dark hat, dark suit, sunglasses), had already left the stage at that point to prepare for his concert.

So what did we learn?
• That he connects with Samuel Beckett, especially in a love of repetition of words and an agreement about having to go on despite a "sense of despair and futility".
• That the song Moondance started as an instrumental, which he had been playing as far back as 1965, when he used to jam on saxophone in Notting Hill with Mick Fleetwood on conga drums. Have I Told You Lately (that I love you) also started as an instrumental.
• That Tore Down a la Rimbaud took eight years to finish – the longest it's ever taken him to complete a song.
• That part of his early song Mystic Eyes was inspired by the scene in Dickens's Great Expectations in which Pip meets Magwitch.
• That he was a big fan of Sixties English folk singer and guitarist Steve Benbow.
The concert, just under an hour, was enjoyable. This was gentle Van with a tight, acoustic, four-piece backing band (piano, double bass, drums, guitar) featuring brief, chatty explanations of the songs he played, including Alan Watt Blues, Wonderful Remark and Why Must I Always Explain. There was a jazzy version of Into the Mystic.

The highlight, showing Morrison at his playful best, was a version of Coney Island. In the foreword to the book, Rankin says of Morrison's music: "There was a search for the spiritual in the commonplace . . . But there are also stories teeming with incidents and characters and grand travelogues, and extolling of life's simple pleasures."
That's true of the spoken song Coney Island, which Morrison said had a significance because as a boy, around 1959, he helped deliver bread in the van for Stewart's bakery in East Belfast and he would have to get up at 5am to make deliveries at the beach in Coney Island. Belfast, of that time, resonates in some of his best songs about Orangefield, which was still almost a village with cobbled streets when he was growing up.

Although Coney Island had been read out earlier by Longley, Morrison played around with the composition, telling the affluent audience that "jam jar" was "Cockney rhyming slang for car" and, with a grin, changing the emotional end to the song, which is about a car journey across the glorious countryside of Northern Ireland, to include the joke:
'And all the time going to Coney Island I'm thinking,
Shall I drop you off at the next corner?'
For Morrison fans the book is interesting (although for the £500 deluxe version you might want your own Van the Man house concert), not least because you can finally learn some of the lines to songs such as Bulbs, in which I now know he sings about someone called Ada:
'Now Ada was a straight clear case of,
Havin' taken in too much juice.'
You also get a sense of the range of his writing and some of the bleakness in lesser known compositions such as Not Supposed to Break Down:
'Fifteen families starving,
All around the corner block.
Here we're standing so alone,
Just like Gibraltar Rock.'
But Longley was right. This was a unique event, right down to Morrison, no isolated rock for once, exiting stage left, whispering like a revivalist preacher, as he sang a line about crossing a river.
-Martin Chilton


London Evening Standard

Van Morrison has long been regarded as pop’s outpost of grouch. Not any more. Not since last night, when Morrison was gently interviewed on stage by the well-researched and only slightly cowed author Ian Rankin. Whatever Morrison’s motives beyond promoting a book (and Lit Up Inside is a lyrics compendium rather than an autobiography), the writer of Why Must I Always Explain? explained himself with good grace and even a smile.

If that wasn’t enough, Ulster poet Michael Longley and Ireland’s esteemed author Edna O’Brien out read some of Morrison’s lyrics. At the age of 83 O’Brien’s glamorous, stately magnificence remains undimmed: wonderfully, she declaimed Tore Down a la Rimbaud like a frisky Shakespearean heroine.

After that, Morrison’s set might have been an anticlimax. Instead, he cheerily and painstakingly introduced almost every song, most of which had been referenced in the chat or spoken by the Irish giants.

Better still, the man who has spent recent years bludgeoning his back catalogue into bluesy pub rock has rediscovered what made him great. Backed by a super-subtle, super-restrained four-piece band and referencing Samuel Beckett, Byron and Allen Ginsberg, Morrison showcased his almost other-worldly ability to paint word pictures.

The lengthy, languid and impossibly beautiful On Hyndford Street ended the evening with Morrison singing off-stage and, amazingly, he even inserted a genuinely funny new line into Coney Island. As an artist and as a performer, Van Morrison is re-born. About time too.
-JOHN AIZLEWOOD

Setlist (Thanks David K)
Intro: Eamon Hughes
Film: Foreign Window Van with Dylan
Q&A: Ian Rankin & Van
Film: Van & Michael Longley
Reading: Michael Longley - Coney Island & Into The Mystic
Reading: Edna O'Brien - Tore Down a La Rimbaud & Madame George

Second Half - Van & His Band:
Alan Watts Blues
Foreign Window
Tore Down A La Rimbaud
Wonderful Remark
Coney Island
Why Must I Always Explain?
Celtic Excavation/Into The Mystic
Madame George
On Hyndford Street

Big Hand for The Band!
Dave Keary (Guitar)
Paul Moore (Bass)
Paul Moran (Keyboards)
Bobby Ruggiero (Drums)

Monday, November 03, 2014

03-November-2014
Nell's Jazz and Blues Bar

 London, England


FOR MARY AT NELL’S

A very interesting show in which Van The Man became Van The Blues Man, Van The Comic, and Van The Raconteur. Maybe Billy Connolly was right after all.

The words ‘health’ and ‘safety’ didn’t apply tonight with 300+ souls rammed into the space for 150 laid back jazzers. Thanks goodness some wag didn’t shout “f-f-fire” during Streets Of Arklow. Remind me not to go back to Nell’s when there is a crowd-puller on stage.

But at least most of the crowd had a close up and personal sight and sound of Van enjoying himself for once. Having seen many interminable, by rote, shows during the last 20 years it was a joy to see those besuited legs a-pumpin’, the chest expandin’ and the jowls a-howlin’.

A pretty pedestrian start with Van warming up the band and getting their chops loosened. A real pleasure to hear the new(ish) vocalist Dana letting rip on New Symphony Sid – she has a fine jazz and gospel voice and is more than capable of standing with Van on an equal footing. Even when she was presented twice with songs she was not prepared for (Streets and Somerset) she slipped in behind Van with some choice harmonising.

The first highlight hurried in with Someone Like You – a long-time personal favourite – which was delivered in style and with much emotion. A lovely version. Then came Van’s dedication of Magic Time to Mary Bell – an unexpectted but sincere tribute and a very dynamic reading of the song too. Maybe us fans are not so parasitic after all.

We then settled into some excellent versions of well-known Van standards – a rich and concentrated In The Midnight, a spirited Rough God with Dana letting go, and a good reading of If You Only Knew which I haven’theard live for ages – since 2003 GB tells me.

Van’s maracas had by now appeared from backstage, so it was OK to summon up the ghosts of Bo Diddley and Them. In fact much of the blues material reminded me so much of Van as lead singer of an r&b band – what with Dave playing those Billy Harrison licks. The r&B section finished with the Harpo belter Them made ‘famous’ Don’t Start Crying Now, and Van mentioned his recent Slim Harpo award which he said wasn’t on his website - takes two clicks Van, to find it. A diverting Sometimes We Cry followed, with Van cupping his ear a la Johnny Ray (sorry, reader, but I am old enough to remember Johnny Ray ‘crying’ with his hand over his bad ear on Sunday Night At The London Palladium).

Hooker’s Think Twice was another belter, and the show was chugging along at a goodly 7 out of 10 when a jolly decent fellow down front requested Streets Of Arklow. Van hesitated at first but Paul Moran’s enthusiasm led into Van getting into the zone and rendering a delicious balanced Streets, summoning up those long past celtic emotions from his Irish trip in the rearlly 70s, and the show became an instant 7.5!

Next up was more Hooker with that fabulous Hooker boogie. Having been immersed in a 45 minute Canned Heat boogie down the Marquee in the 60s, I just love it, and even the Red Hot Pokers’ version coiuldn’t destroy that riff. Of course Van brought it off in great style – ad-libbing the Henry’s Swing Club verse into Nell’s Club and Kensington High Street, and Vince Power got one more of the many name-checks.

Through some throwaway Van stuff in the next couple of ditties, and another fine Moondance. Van went off and was soon back on to play tribute to his old acker, Acker Bilk, with Somerset. Then the evening finished with a roaring Help Me full of improvs around the Revue-era Lonely Avenue.

All in all a thoroughly satisfactory show with some real highs and no lows, no tumbleweed tonight, and Van as loose, amiable, chattyand funny as I’ve ever seen him. Echoing Brendan’s last comments, I still want to hear more of the Van Classics - even some of those in Lit Up Inside – and most of those that aren’t. But not all long-time fans agree – they want a rich stew with many elements – not just Van’s writing. But after all, in 50 years time no-one will be singing Van’s songs like Van!
-Simon Gee


7.5 / 10

NELL’S JAZZ & BLUES CLUB
LONDON
ENGLAND
3 NOVEMBER 2014
1h 51m
:Celtic Swing (*)
:Lost John
:The New Symphony Sid
:Someone Like You
:Magic Time
:Who Can I Turn To?
:In The Midnight
:Rough God Goes Riding
:If You Only Knew
:I Can Tell
:Baby Please Don't Go >
Parchman Farm >
Don't Start Crying Now
:Sometimes We Cry
:Think Twice Before You Go
:Streets of Arklow
:Boogie Chillen
:Whenever God Shines His Light
:Brown Eyed Girl
:Moondance >
My Funny Valentine
***
:Somerset
:Help Me > Stormy Monday >
Night Time Is The Right Time >
Lonely Avenue >
Mansion On The Hill >
Mean Old World

Van Morrison : vocals (except on *), saxes, harmonicas, maracas
The Van Morrison Band : Dave Keary : guitar; Dana Masters : lead and back-up vocals; Paul Moran : keyboards, MA; Paul Moore : electric and double bass; Bobby Ruggiero: drums, MC; Alistair White : trombone, tuba; Chris White : saxophones, flute.

Setlist (Thanks Mike S.)
Celtic Swing
Lost John
Symphony Sid
Someone Like You
Magic Time (Dedicated by Van to Mary Bell)
Who Can I Turn To
In the Midnight
Rough God Goes Riding
If You Only Knew
I Can Tel (You Don't Love Me)
Baby Please Don't Go/Parchment Farm/Don't Start Cryin' Now
Sometimes We Cry
Think Twice Before You Go
Streets of Arklow
Boogie Chillin
Whenever God Shines His Light
Brown Eyed Girl
Moondance/Funny Valentine
Somerset (Acker Bilk tribute)
Help Me/Stormy Monday/Lonely Ave/Stormy Monday

Big Hand for The Band!
Chris White (Saxophone)
Alistair White (Trombone)
Dave Keary (Guitar)
Paul Moore (Bass)
Paul Moran (Keyboards)
Bobby Ruggiero (Drums)
Dana Masters (Vocals)

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

28-October-2014
Royal Albert Hall

 London, England


Van Morrison at Royal Albert Hall,London-28th October, 2014

Van Morrison returned to the Royal Albert Hall on Tuesday night to do his third Bluesfest headline concert in just under two and a half years to another capacity audience. Opening as usual with Celtic Swing, Van then followed with a very jazzy Lost John, If You Only Knew and Talk is Cheap before introducing as his guest the one and only Georgie Fame.I thought he would do his party piece Vanlose Stairway duet with Van but alas it was not to be and instead we got New Symphony Sid which is a poor substitute. This had been a pretty mundane start to the show and I was fearing the worst but happily there was much better to come starting with a stirring cover of John Lee Hooker's Think Twice Before You Ago. Sometimes We Cry was powerfully delivered aided in no small measure by Dana Masters on shared vocals.A thunderous Baby Please Don't Go was combined with Parchman Farm and Don't Stop Crying Now to really up the tempo.Rough God Goes Riding was a real highlight, not only because it was a particularly good version, but also because it featured Van doing impressions of Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, Cary Grant and Clint Eastwood .The Joe Pesci one was particularly good and Van delivered it with such gusto that it left me wondering if he may have aspirations of achieving an Oscar nomination sometime in the future to go with all his music awards. A jazzy Back on Top followed but I have to say that I don't think this arrangement matches the original one. The magnificent Queen of the Slipstream followed and was quite breath taking. The audience cheered wildly after this one and were clearly pretty ecstatic. Whenever God Shines His Light followed and again featured Dana Masters prominently on vocals. I Can't Stop Loving You was followed by a really good version of Real Real Gone which finished with You Send Me featuring the brass section and Dana on vocals to great effect. Next up was All In The Game which Van told us had been recorded by hundreds of artists but not like this. How right he is as this is one cover version by Van that I never tire of hearing as he has really made the song his own and no other version even comes close to matching his.We again got an extended 12 minute version with Van really getting into it and bringing us to the burning ground but no mention of safety nets this time though. Van departed the stage at this point but not to the ecstatic response one might normally expect. Judging by the looks of astonishment on people's faces it was because they couldn't believe the concert could possibly be coming to an end at 8.50 pm which is perfectly understandable as most people going to a concert don't expect to be going home around 9.00 pm and most of the other Bluesfest concerts had scheduled finishing times of 11.00pm. Mercifully Van returned twice to deliver Boogie Chillen, Help Me/Lonely Avenue and the always welcome Ballerina but it was all over far too quickly which resulted in quite a lot of adverse comment afterwards.



One very surprising fact which emerged from this concert is that, when account is taken of the full songs and segments of songs done on the night, half of them were not written by Van but were covers of other peoples work. In the context of the recent publication of Lit Up Inside featuring Van's lyrics it is somewhat ironic that he would choose to spend half the concert doing cover versions of other people's work to the exclusion of so many brilliant songs from his own repertoire which never get an airing(Madame George, When The Healing Has Begun,The Healing Game, Streets of Arklow, Troubadors and St. Dominics's Preview being just a few examples) and which are vastly superior to most of the songs by others that he regularly includes.

In summary, this concert had moments of high quality with Van clearly in great form and the band excellent as usual but the chosen set list largely dictates the real quality of a Van Morrison concert and this one was quite lacking given that the vast majority of the most brilliant songs Van has written were not played which is a real pity as their inclusion would undoubtedly elevate his concerts to heights that few artists could even come close to matching.
-Brendan Hynes


Setlist
Celtic Swing
Lost John
Talk is Cheap
If You Only Knew
The New Symphony Sid (w/Georgie Fame)
Think Twice Before You Go
Sometimes We Cry
Baby Please Don’t Go
Rough God Goes Riding
Back On Top
Queen of the Slipstream
Enlightenment
Whenever God Shines His Light
I Can’t Stop Loving You
Real Real Gone
All in the Game
Boogie Chillen’
Help Me
Ballerina

Big Hand for The Band!
Chris White (Saxophone)
Alistair White (Trombone)
Dave Keary (Guitar)
Paul Moore (Bass)
Paul Moran (Keyboards)
Bobby Ruggiero (Drums)
Dana Masters (Vocals)

Monday, October 27, 2014

26-October-2014
Europa Hotel

 Belfast, Northern Ireland

via Pablo G.

Setlist
Celtic Swing
New Symphony Sid
Baby Please Don't Go
Rough God Goes Riding
Queen of the Slipstream
Sometimes We Cry
Think Twice Before You Go
Days Like This
Whenever God Shines His Light
I Can Tell (You Don't Love Me)
If You Only Knew
That's Life
Philosopher's Stone
It's All In The Game
Glad Tidings
Boogie Chillun
In the Garden
On Hyndford Street

Big Hand for The Band!
Chris White (Saxophone)
Alistair White (Trombone)
Dave Keary (Guitar)
Paul Moore (Bass)
Paul Moran (Keyboards)
Bobby Ruggiero (Drums)
Dana Masters (Vocals)

Sunday, October 26, 2014

25-October-2014
Europa Hotel

 Belfast, Northern Ireland


MLK in IRE Blog

There is something innately special about the thought of seeing a favorite artist or band play their hometown. Dylan in Minnesota. Bruce in Jersey. Wilco in Chicago. To see these guys perform where it all began, before all the hype and celebrity nearly guarantees a unique and powerful performance unlike any other.

Van Morrison, having long been revered amongst the extended Kane and Fitzpatrick family, would easily fit in this camp. I have fond memories of listening to “Wild Night” on repeat while drinking Tahitian Treat by the case load and battling my brothers in NHL ’95 over and over again at my dad’s house nearly 20 years ago. He has since stayed on my short list of favorites through the years; with a more recent highlight being able to witness, along with 100,000+ of our closest friends, Morrison deliver a blistering set to close out the 2010 New Orleans Jazz Fest.

So last week when I discovered Van was playing an intimate show in his hometown of Belfast, it was a no brainer: I was hopping a bus and heading north. What made this gig even more compelling was the venue of choice, the historic Europa Hotel. Known as the most bombed hotel in the world after suffering nearly 30 attacks during The Troubles, it has persevered through the years and is now a main tourist destination and top hotel for Belfast City. President and First Lady Clinton stayed here in 1995 and 1998 while working on the peace process in Northern Ireland. NOTE: I unsuccessfully tried to book into the Clinton Suite for my stay on Saturday night, although the fine folks at the front desk did put me just down the hall on the 10th floor.

After a five-hour journey with connecting busses from Galway to Dublin and Dublin to Belfast, I arrived at the Europa Hotel Saturday evening just in time for the pre show ballroom dinner. Yes, when you book a ticket to see Van Morrison in a 300-person room in the most famous hotel in his hometown, you get a full course meal and all you can drink wine before the show. Who says Van is a total curmudgeon?

At my table were a great group from Belfast who had all seen similar shows from Van at least four or five times previously. They were pleasantly surprised to hear my story of why an American living in the West of Ireland decided to travel north for the night to see the show (when it was established that no one at the table was familiar with Pearl Jam or Wilco I decided to hold off on describing any of my other previous rock n roll pilgrimages) and remarked how they were fascinated by the amount of people they have met who travel from all over the world for a chance to see the legend play his hometown.

Moments after the final plate was cleared the band took the stage, launching into the instrumental “Celtic Swing,” with Van leading the way with his signature sax.

What struck me most about Morrison last night was his effortless skill as a bandleader. Directing his seven-piece group with both a casual persona as well as a striking professionalism of someone who has been at the top of his game for over five decades. He truly appeared to be enjoying himself on stage too, remarking halfway through his set, “Hey I’ve finally got a pulse tonight!”

Whether it was because it was a hometown show or just a lucky Saturday night, the crowd was treated to two hours of amazing music from one of the greatest musicians the world has ever known. With a songbook as rich as his to pull from, there was no sign of the massive chart topping hits that are played at karaoke bars every night the world over, and I don’t think the crowd would’ve had it any other way. If you told me some 20 years ago that one day I’d witness Van The Man perform in such an intimate and historic venue right in his own backyard, the word “surreal” would immediately come to mind. Last night confirmed it, a night I will not soon forget.

Until next time.

-MLK

Setlist
Celtic Swing
You Make Me Feel So Free
Lost John
Someone Like You
Magic Time
Talk is Cheap
Think Twice Before You Gp
Blues Medley
Baby Please Don't Go
Enlightenment
I Cant Stop Loving You
Whenever God Shines His Light
Back on Top
Days Like This
Rough God Goes Riding
Georgia
Glad Tidings
Boogie Chillun
In the Garden
Help me

Big Hand for The Band!
Chris White (Saxophone)
Alistair White (Trombone)
Dave Keary (Guitar)
Paul Moore (Bass)
Paul Moran (Keyboards)
Bobby Ruggiero (Drums)
Dana Masters (Vocals)

Friday, September 26, 2014

25-September-2014
University Concert Hall

 Limerick, Ireland

Via Salvatore Conte
Brendan sent in this review
It was over 10 years since Van Morrison last played Limerick but sadly this was not quite the triumphant return I had hoped for. Given that this concert was part of the Limerick Jazz Festival it wasn’t too surprising that many of the numbers were of the jazzier variety but add in the fact that Van decided to play just about every one of the crowd pleaser ‘greatest hit’songs in his catalogue and you ended up with a pretty disappointing show.

The show opened as usual with Celtic Swing which was followed by a quite jazzy arrangement of the seldom played You Make Me Feel So Free with backing vocalist Dana Masters making a significant contribution. Lost John from the Skiffle Sessions followed and quite honestly I would have been quite happy if John had stayed lost. The sublime Someone Like You followed and again featured Dana Masters prominently as she swapped verses with Van. A jazz infused Only a Dream featured the brass section prominently in a nice arrangement. The wonderful Queen of the Slipstream followed and this was one of the few real highlights of the concert. Baby Please Don’t Go/Parchman Farm really brought the crowd to life although I felt the delivery lacked some of the power of previous renditions. A pleasant Magic Time was followed by the old standard Who Can I Turn To which, while emphasising Van’s continued vocal prowess, did not do much for me on a personal level. At this stage Van went firmly into coasting crowd pleasing mode with Moondance, Enlightenment (a temporary respite), Days Like This, Whenever God Shines His Light and Precious Time following in quick succession. It was back to the blues then for Help Me after which Van’s sole interaction with the audience followed as he acknowledged Sonny Boy Williamson before introducing the John Lee Hooker song Think Twice Before You Go which seemed to catch some of the band by surprise. I thought this version was really good and Van and the band fairly motored throughout it’s delivery. 

It was back to jazz then with New Symphony Sid which featured Dana Masters prominently again. Two rarities followed in renditions of Glad Tidings (the crowd got quite involved in hand clapping at appropriate stages during this on the promptings of band members) and Joyous Sound. Finally the concert was brought to it’s conclusion with an extended version of Brown Eyed Girl as the band played on long after Van had exited the stage and no encore to follow. It was the last way I would want a Van Morrison concert to end but it was consistent with the nature of the show that had been delivered on the night. When measured against the quality of many of the shows this year(particularly the magnificent Hampton Court and second night at Orangefield) this concert pales into insignificance with a total absence of the extended transcendental moments where Van really immerses himself in the songs and brings proceedings to a level that inspires his musicians and audience alike.

-Brendan Hynes

Setlist (Thanks Hilary)
Celtic Swing
You Make Me Feel So Free
Lost John
Someone Like You
Only A Dream
Queen Of The Slipstream
Baby Please Don't Go
Magic Time
Who Can I Turn To
Moondance
Enlightenment
Days Like This
Whenever God Shines His Light
Precious Time
Help Me
Think Twice Before You Go
New Symphony Sid
Glad Tidings
Joyous Sound
Brown Eyed Girl

Big Hand for The Band!
Chris White (Saxophone)
Alistair White (Trombone)
Dave Keary (Guitar)
Paul Moore (Bass)
Paul Moran (Keyboards)
Bobby Ruggiero (Drums)
Dana Masters (Vocals)

Friday, September 05, 2014

Lit Up Inside
Selected Lyrics

 Van Morrison

Introduction by Eamonn Hughes
Foreword by David Meltzer, Ian Rankin


Van Morrison selects his best and most iconic lyrics, spanning 50 years of writing and representing his entire creative journey.

Van Morrison is one of a handful of truly iconic twentieth century artists. Along with Bob Dylan, he was one of the first contemporary lyricists to infuse a serious poetic sensibility into popular music. A colossal influence on a wide range of fellow musicians, he has been a singular beacon of artistic integrity, soulful conviction and musical excellence.

One of the greatest singer/songwriters of all time, Morrison has been following his muse in an uncompromising way since the early Sixties. He has explored soul, jazz, blues, rhythm & blues, rock and roll, Celtic folk, pop balladry and more, forging a distinctive amalgam that has Morrison's unvarnished passion at its core. He has referred to his music as "Caledonia soul," reflecting his deep immersion in American roots music and Ulster-Scots.

This personal selection of what Morrison himself has judged to be his most important and enduring lyrical work will stand as a landmark public statement from an otherwise intensely private artist, an intimate and very intentional view onto what Morrison himself esteems as his creative contribution.

The introduction by Eamonn Hughes, of Queen's University Belfast, gives a career-long overview of the creative influences Morrison has absorbed and channeled through the years, and the forewords provided by poet David Meltzer and novelist Ian Rankin provide an appreciation of the writer's craft demonstrated in Morrison's evocative, timeless lyrics.

A must for any fan, and a solid introduction to this singular, iconic talent.

*A UK edition of Lit Up Inside will be released simultaneously by Faber and Faber.

"Tupelo Honey has always existed and Van Morrison was merely the vessel and the earthly vehicle for it."–Bob Dylan

"I know of no music that is more lucid, feelable, hearable, seeable, touchable, no music you can experience more intensely than this. Not just moments, but extended . . . periods of experience which convey the feel of what films could be: a form or perception which no longer burls itself blindly on meanings and definitions, but allows the sensuous to take over and grow . . . where indeed something does become indescribable."–Wim Wenders, filmmaker

"No other Irish poets–writing either in verse or in music–have come within a Honda's roar of Patrick Kavanagh and Van Morrison"–Paul Durcan

Available Mid-October. Sign up for alert about the book’s release at City Light's link below.

Publisher City Lights Publishers
Format Hardcover
Nb of pages 230 p.
ISBN-10 0872866777
ISBN-13 9780872866775

Monday, August 25, 2014

24-August-2014
Orangefield High School

 Belfast, Northern Ireland

Belfast Telegraph

I have a confession to make. I'm not really sure it's a wise move to confess it in this newspaper, but here goes. I never really got Van Morrison. When I was young, I took the road signposted punk rock, garage and New York, stuff like Talking Heads and Velvet Underground plus a lot of reggae. R'n'B, Caledonian/Celtic soul and all that sort of thing was another musical highway heading in another direction.

When friends said Astral Weeks, I said White Light/White Heat in the sort of uncompromising, boneheaded arguments that the young have over music.

Coming to Northern Ireland, you have to be careful, though. Van is yours and, no matter how often he has failed to return your affection, that far-away look in your eye when his music is mentioned is a warning sign not to be flippant.

Certainly not to suggest in jest, as I did once, that if Van was playing in my back garden I'd pull the curtains and put on the snooker. People in this office have still not forgiven me for that.

But in recent times I have been fascinated by his story arc. He's given so much back to Belfast lately and gigged so often I think he might actually be due to play my back garden soon.

We'll never know why he's come back to us big-style, because he'll never tell us. But his co-operation with the new Mystic Of The East heritage trail, which takes us to The Hollow, Connswater River, Cyprus Avenue and all the places that formed him and figure in his songs is perhaps a sign that, as we get older, those of us who have spent much of our lives "getting away" at some point spiritually or physically long to return.

We begin to forgive home for the sins we attached to it, recognise that in our impetuous, grab-at-life youth we were partially to blame for our acrimonious separation and start to make our peace. And perhaps Van has now turned this life journey into one of the most artistically poignant performances we are likely to witness.

The chance to see this is why, together with hundreds of others, I am crammed into the plastic moulded chairs of our school-day nightmares as Van plays the last of his gigs at Orangefield School's assembly hall on Sunday night.

Surreal isn't really the word. The place is closing down almost before our eyes, the last pupils having left last term. The fixtures and fittings are being taken down. You half expect the doors to be removed from their hinges by the time you come to leave.

But here we are in the hall where the young Van probably sat dreaming of escape while the headmaster droned on up on the stage. Now we are in Van's place and he is up there. Except we do not take our eyes off him nor refrain from listening.

On the tiny stage he is delivering what might be one of the gigs of his life using a voice of such astonishing lustre and beauty it's like he's stolen it from a man half his age.

He doesn't really acknowledge us, but nobody expected him to. The songs, full of the loving references to this place and its surrounds, are moving even to this sceptic's ears.

Around us all is changing and soon, when the bulldozers come, this gig will join the ghosts of thousands of kids being ordered not to run in the corridors, in detentions, winning sports days, just vague outlines, hazy memories.

Sunday night's audience know how lucky they are to have such a chronicler for their small part of the world. Van's songs are timeless even as buildings are reduced to dust.

Would you still pull your curtains, my companion asks as we head out into the night? Probably not, I admit.
-Mike Gibson

Setlist (Thanks David K.)
Celtic Swing
Got To Go Back
Joyous Sound
Centrepiece
Orangefield
Magic Time
Someone Like You
Northern Muse
Whenever God
Cleaning Windows
Too Many Myths
Talk is Cheap
Baby Please Don't Go/Parchman Farm
Sometimes We Cry
Brown Eyed Girl
Precious Time
Enlightenment
Hyndford Street
Ballerina
In The Garden

Big Hand for The Band!
Chris White (Saxophone)
Alistair White (Trombone)
Dave Keary (Guitar)
Paul Moore (Bass)
Paul Moran (Keyboards)
Bobby Ruggiero (Drums)
Special Guest: Dana Masters (Vocals)